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    05 ROYAL OBSESSIONS FROM THE PAST.

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    1. First and foremost, Queen Elizabeth I was a self-obsessed beauty queen. After recovering from smallpox, she wore white, lead-based foundation and red lipstick containing mercury for years to hide her scars. A few years of her life were shaved off because of her makeup habits.

    05 ROYAL OBSESSIONS FROM THE PAST
    Portrait of Queen Elizabeth. Image credit: Shutterstock

    Cosmetics are always bad for your skin, but Queen Elizabeth I’s makeup from the 16th century was particularly harmful. When it came to makeup, she had a very toxic relationship. Smallpox ravaged Elizabeth in 1562, resulting in a high fever. Although she survived smallpox, the disease left her with permanent scars on her face.

    This resulted in a change in her physical appearance, making her more open to criticism. She began using Venetian ceruse, a white lead and vinegar-based cosmetic compound, to hide her imperfections. Lead is a toxic substance that has been linked to a wide range of health issues.

    Elizabeth washed her face with a mixture of eggshells, alum, and mercury to remove her make-up. Her final years were marked by memory loss, irritability, and depression due to mercury poisoning. Cinnabar and mercury were used to create her signature red lipstick.

    Her dangerous make-up routine caused her a lot of harm. Until the end of her days, Queen Elizabeth wore layers and layers of her lethal makeup. She died on March 24, 1603, and it’s possible that her habitual use of make-up contributed to her death. (Source)

    ROYAL OBSESSIONS FROM THE PAST.

    2. Many monarchs were known to be cannibals, including several of the British monarchs. They used human body parts as medicine and ate human organs. The town’s executioners sold human body parts to local doctors. A natural life force was believed to be ingested by the person who consumed it after death.

    Image is used for representational purposes only. Image credit: Shutterstock

    Unlike the majority of the population, some monarchs did not view corpses with the same level of disgust and revulsion that we do. There were those who believed that eating these corpses would bring healing to the eater. King Charles II and William II of England were cannibals as well as Danish king Christian IV and French monarch François I.

    “Mumia,” or human body parts, were a staple of their diet. Executioners traded these body parts to apothecaries and physicians. The doctors reasoned that a person’s body parts would be more potent if they had been ripped apart in a violent death.

    A person’s soul is thought to be trapped in his or her body for a period of time after death, so that the body parts of a living person can be consumed for their benefit. It was thought that the person consuming the deceased’s body parts would consume the rest of the deceased’s natural lifespan.

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    05 ROYAL OBSESSIONS FROM THE PAST
    Friedrich Wilhelm I. Image credits: cracked.comnpg.org.uk

    This is not how the Prussian Military in the 1700s decided who could join. Instead, they looked at their skills. From 1713 to 1740, when Friedrich Wilhelm I was the ruler of Prussia, tall people were more likely to be chosen for the army than short people.

    They had to be at least 6 feet tall in order to join the Prussian Army. Because heights aren’t that important. The reason Friedrich made a whole army of giants was because he had a strange love for tall men. This love turned into an obsession when he made a whole army of them.

    To make his army bigger after becoming the new King, he increased the size of it from 38,000 soldiers to 83,000. As per the rules, some giants joined the army on their own, but others were either given or kidnapped. People called this army of giants the “Potsdam Giants,” or they called them the “Lange Kerle.” This army was called “The Grand Grenadiers” (The Long Guys). People who were tall were paid based on their height and treated very well when they joined the army.

    4. Ivan IV, the first czar of Russia, had a terrible obsession with cutting people up and killing them. From the time he was a child, he liked torturing small animals. As he got older, his fun turned into a full-time job. He killed people by boiling them, tearing them apart with horses, or roasting them over a fire, to name a few ways.

    05 ROYAL OBSESSIONS FROM THE PAST
    The monument of Ivan IV. Image credit: Shutterstock

    First, Ivan IV, was crowned in 1547. When he was in charge, he was paranoid, bloodthirsty, and a little crazy. He was called “Ivan the Terrible.” He had a strong desire to kill and maim people. At first, Ivan spent his free time torturing and killing small animals. He used to stab birds’ eyes and cut their bodies up, and he would throw cats and dogs to their deaths from high places.

    His favorite thing to do was to hurt animals when he was younger, but his love of torturing turned into an obsession as he grew up. When he got older, it wasn’t animals but real people that he cared about more than ever. Ivan used to kill anyone he thought was disloyal, but now he doesn’t do that. Impaling, boiling alive, roasting over an open fire, and being torn apart by horses were some of his favorite ways to kill people.

    5. The first emperor of China, Qin Shihuang, was very concerned about his own life and didn’t care about the people around him. He wanted to live for ever. There were many things that he spent a lot of money, time, and effort on in order to find the key to eternal life. The emperor would drink a lot of elixirs and potions to make him live longer. It’s very likely that the potions he drank with mercury and jade were the reason for how he died.

    05 ROYAL OBSESSIONS FROM THE PAST
    Elixir bottle potion (Image to the left), Terracotta Army museum. Beige stone statue of Emperor Qin Shi Huang towers over roofs of buildings. Image credit: Shutterstock

    As many people as we know want to live for ever. The Emperor of China was so obsessed with immortality that his desire for it became his main goal. Qin Shihuang, who was the first emperor of China, survived many assassination attempts and always feared that there were plans to get rid of him.

    As time went on, he was afraid that the spirit of the person he killed might come back to haunt him after he died. There were many things that he did and money that he spent looking for the key to eternal life.

    Qin Shihuang thought he could rule for ever, so he started taking potions and elixirs made by alchemists. That there were three spirit mountains in the Bohai Sea where fairies with the elixir of life were said to live. He thought that was true.

    However, he couldn’t go to these mountains, so he made an elixir of his own to help him. Early alchemists thought that mercury was a “immortal elixir,” so these potions are made with mercury and jade.

    Qin Shihuang’s long search for immortality came to an end on September 10, 210 BCE, when he died because of the elixir and potions he took to make him live longer.

    See more: 50 Totally Unbelievable Facts You Didn’t Know

    Unique positioned Glenrio was able to skirt government regulations.

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    Glenrio is a small railroad and farming community in northern California.
    There were a number of railroads built near the Texas-New Mexico border in Deaf Smith and Quay Counties during the first half of 1901. An official town was incorporated two years later in Rock Island, which later became known as Glenrio.

    Photo Credit: Charles Henry / CC BY-NC 2.0
    Unique positioned Glenrio was able to skirt government regulations.
    Photo Credit: Jasperdo / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    In 1905, this Unique positioned Glenrio area was opened to cattle farmers, and for a time, the town’s population was dominated by large ranches. As time passed, the land was transformed into vast sorghum and wheat fields. After Glenrio saw an increase in visitors from the Ozark Trail in 1917, more structures were constructed, and locals began to move in. Despite this, there were never more than a dozen people living there.

    A hardware store, land office, and hotel were all established in Glenrio by the turn of the twentieth century, along with service stations, cafes, and grocery stores. From 1910 to 1934, the Glenrio Tribune was the town’s newspaper.

    Photo Credit: Mobilus in Mobili / Flickr CC BY 2.0
    Photo Credit: Renelibrary / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

    People in this town have developed some peculiar customs to get around the various restrictions that come with living on the Texas-New Mexico border. While Glenrio’s gas stations were all in Texas because of the lower gas prices there, its bars were in New Mexico because of the prohibition on alcohol in Texas. In addition, even though the post office was in New Mexico, the mail was delivered to the Texas railroad depot instead of the New Mexico one.

    Tourists flock to the US Route 66.

    During the 1930s, the Ozark Trail was transformed into a two-lane highway that linked much of the southwest United States. New businesses opened up as a result of Glenrio’s central location between Amarillo and Tucumcari because of its convenient location.

    Unique positioned Glenrio

    Unique positioned Glenrio was able to skirt government regulations.
    Photo Credit: Renelibrary / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0
    Unique positioned Glenrio was able to skirt government regulations.
    Photo Credit: Jasperdo / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    New hotels, restaurants, and gas stations popped up all over town, including a long line outside the Texaco station and the Little Juarez Café. In the 1950s, both houses were constructed in the Art Moderne architectural style.

    Photo Credit: Wordbuilder / Wikimedia Commons CC BY 3.0
    Unique positioned Glenrio was able to skirt government regulations.
    Photo Credit: jaygannett / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

    Additionally, Glenrio became a filming location for Hollywood productions. Despite the town having been abandoned for decades, scenes from the 1940 film The Grapes of Wrath and the 2018 film Daylight’s End were filmed there.

    An interesting tidbit: It also served as the inspiration behind Cars’ Radiator Springs.

    Decline is caused by the construction of I-40.


    After the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad depot was closed in Glenrio in 1955, the town’s population began to plummet. Construction of Interstate 40 in the mid-1970s bypassed the town, which had a devastating impact. More tourists visited Glenrio on I-40 than on Route 66 because it was designed to get drivers where they needed to go as quickly as possible.

    Photo Credit: Pom’ / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 2.0
    Photo Credit: Bradley Fulton / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    At that point, there were only two people left in the town, and the post office was the only place still open. It wasn’t long before they left and the post office was closed, turning Glenrio into a deserted ghost town.

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    Glenrio is reduced to a ghost town.


    On its website, the National Register of Historic Places in 2007 listed the Glenrio Historical District, which included 12 buildings and four additional structures. A year later, the state of New Mexico opened the Glenrio Visitor Center along the I-40, which includes information kiosks, a livestock corral, a movie theater and a pet walk. Eco-friendly features include a greywater recycling system and a wind turbine in its design, which can handle up to one million visitors per year.

    Photo Credit: Rodrigo Paredes / Wikimedia Commons CC BY 2.0
    Photo Credit: Wordbuilder / Wikimedia Commons CC BY 3.0

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    All that is left of Glenrio today are a few crumbling buildings that have been exposed to the sun’s rays for far too long. In spite of its decrepit state, the Texaco service station and Little Juarez Café and State Line Motel are still visible from the roadside. “First in Texas” or “Last in Texas” are two different signs that appear on the same stretch of Route 66.

    The City of the Century, now it’s more like a ghost town.

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    There are a lot of cities in the United States that have been mostly abandoned. One of them is Gary, Indiana, which is in Indiana. With just over 76,000 people living there, the city was a big hit when the country’s steel industry went down. This left it in a state of abandonment and disrepair.

    A lot of steel is made.


    In 1906, the United States Steel Corporation built a new plant called Gary Works in Gary, Indiana. The company named the town after the plant. Elbert Henry Gary, the founder of U.S. Steel Corporation, thought the spot on the south side of Lake Michigan was the best place to build a new steel plant.

    Photo Credit: Rick Harris / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0
    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Wikimedia Commons CC BY 2.0
    The City of the Century, now it's more like a ghost town
    Photo Credit: Joe Tabacca / Bloomberg / Getty Images

    The steel plant’s jobs helped Gary grow quickly. It drew people from outside the city, including African-Americans who had fled the South and were looking for work, as well as European immigrants. A lot of new people moved to the area, which led to a boom in the economy. By the 1920s, Gary Works had more than 16,000 employees, making it the largest steel plant in the country at the time.

    Photo Credit: cgulyas2002 / Flickr CC BY-NC 2.0
    The City of the Century, now it's more like a ghost town
    Photo Credit: Brook Ward / Flickr CC BY-NC 2.0

    In the Second World War, steel production only kept going up. Soon, the United States was making more than 40% of the world’s steel. The steel mills in Illinois and Indiana made 20% of the country’s steel, making them very important. This led to a change in the curriculum at the schools in the area. Skills-based subjects were added to the curriculum.

    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Wikimedia Commons CC BY 2.0
    The City of the Century, now it's more like a ghost town
    Photo Credit: Rick Harris / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0
    Photo Credit: Timothy Neesam / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    Schools, churches, businesses, and civic facilities were built in Gary as a result of the steel industry’s growth and investment in the city’s economy. The city’s downtown became a commercial center, bringing with it the development of architecturally significant attractions such as movie theaters.

    At its peak in 1960, Gary’s population was 178,320 and it was dubbed the “city of the century” by 1970.

    A unique makeup


    There is a lot of diversity in the city of Gary, Indiana. There were four sections: the East, West, South and Glen Park sections when it was established. The East is known for its wood-framed houses, some of the city’s earliest, while the West is known for its wealth. This is evident in the grandeur of the brick houses and larger commercial buildings.

    Photo Credit: *Hajee / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
    The City of the Century, now it's more like a ghost town
    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Flickr CC BY 2.0

    The city has a lot of different neighborhoods, but its downtown is the most important one. People live in Emerson and Downtown West, which are two separate cities. It was built in the 1920s and quickly became known for its impressive architecture. In October 1997, a huge fire destroyed a large part of the area.

    The City of the Century, now it's more like a ghost town
    Photo Credit: Rick Harris / Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0

    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Flickr CC BY 2.0
    Photo Credit: Grace Trivino / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    Most of the buildings that made up the city’s downtown core have been demolished because they were too expensive to fix. The few that remain, like Union Station, City Methodist Church, and the Palace Theater, have mostly been abandoned.

    A long time of fighting.


    During the Steel Strike of 1919, there was a lot of trouble in the city of Gary, Indiana. More and more steelworkers from all over the United States were joining picket lines to fight for better working conditions and higher wages, so they did this When a riot broke out between steelworkers and strikebreakers in Gary on October 4, 1919, things quickly got out of hand. Three days after that, Indiana Governor James P. Goodrich put martial law in place, allowing 4,000 federal troops to come and help restore order.

    Because of growing fears of Russian socialism, a weak workers’ union, and racial tensions, the Steel Strike was mostly ineffective for the country at large.

    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Flickr CC BY 2.0
    Photo Credit: Timothy Neesam / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    As a child, Gary also had to deal with racial segregation. By 1950, the city was one of the most segregated in the United States, with whites and blacks living by very different rules. Because of this, it was a big part of the Civil Rights Movement. Pre-desegregation, 97 percent of the city’s black population lived in the Midtown section, which is a mostly self-contained area just south of downtown that is mostly white.

    The steel industry starts to sway a little.


    Competition from other countries led to a drop in the demand for steel from the United States. U.S. Steel Corporation started to lay off workers at its factories, including one in Gary, Indiana, so that’s why they did this. People at Gary Works were fired in 1971, and by 1990 only 6,000 people worked there. Only 5,100 people worked at the plant in August of that year.

    The City of the Century, now it’s more like a ghost town Photo Credit: Raymond Boyd / Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images
    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Flickr CC BY 2.0
    Photo Credit: *Hajee / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    The City of the Century, now it’s more like a ghost town

    A mass exodus of residents and an increase in crime occurred as a result of a decline in job opportunities in the city. Despite being the “murder capital” of the United States in 1993, Gary’s population was just 76,010 as of 2019. Consequently, the city ranks second only to Detroit in the Rust Belt in terms of population loss since 1900.

    Photo Credit: Scott Olson / Getty Images
    Photo Credit: carol mitchell / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    The city’s economy has been resurrected numerous times, with varying degrees of success. Holiday Inn and a convention center were built as part of this effort, both of which failed to boost revenue. When Cline Avenue was shut down in the 1990s, two casinos opened in the area, but their success was hampered.

    Gary, Indiana, and its tenacious residents
    Gary has become a ghost town because of a lack of employment opportunities. This town’s educational institutions are now largely abandoned. As a result of its current state, the city has been dubbed the most miserable in the United States.

    Photo Credit: John Gress / Getty Images
    Photo Credit: Brook Ward / Flickr CC BY-NC 2.0
    The City of the Century, now it's more like a ghost town
    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Flickr CC BY 2.0

    The residents of Gary, despite the city’s economic decline and hardships, continue to work to restore the city to its former glory. The Miller Beach Arts & Creative District was inaugurated in 2011 and has since gained a lot of attention. The city council also approved the construction of a $45 million minor league baseball stadium, and the city has capitalized on the fact that it was once home to the Jackson 5.

    Photo Credit: John Gress / Getty Images
    Photo Credit: slowdevil / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

    Numerous historic buildings have been recognized by the National Register of Historic Places, including American Sheet and Tin Mill Apartment Buildings, Gary Bathing Beach Aquatorium, Barney Sablotney House, Gary Land Company Building and Gary Land Company Apartment Building.

    Photo Credit: Joe Tabacca / Bloomberg / Getty Images
    Photo Credit: Paul Sableman / Flickr CC BY 2.0
    Photo Credit: ashleydiener / Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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    At least a few years ago, the city of Gary hosted the Miss USA Pageant, and it has been the backdrop for numerous Hollywood films, including the 1996 original gangstas, the remake of A Nightmare on Elm Street, and Transformers: Dark of the Moon, in 2010. In addition, the History Channel filmed its Life After People documentary there.

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    Quinta da Regaleira’s Initiation Well near Sinta, Portugal

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    “What is below corresponds to what is above, and what is above corresponds to what is below, in order to accomplish the One Thing’s miracles.” – Trismegistus Hermes

    The palace, a
    s seen from the bridge over the lower gate. Author: Lusitana – CC BY 2.5

    The wealthy Portuguese businessman Antonio Augusto Carvalho Monteiro, who owned Quinta da Regaleira, was a well-known Freemason. He designed and built the four-hectare property, which features enigmatic buildings, mysterious parks, and underground tunnels, with the assistance of Italian architect Luigi Manini.

    Each structure in Quinta da Regaleira is adorned with numerous symbols associated with masonry, alchemy, the Rosicrucian and Hermetic traditions, the Knights Templar, and Tarot mysticism.

    Looking down into the Initiation Well. Author: Stijndon – CC BY-SA 3.0

    The Quinta da Regaleira estate is dubbed “Monteiro the Millionaire’s Palace.” The palace, built in 1904, is without a doubt the estate’s crown jewel. The five-story mansion features a Gothic facade adorned with carved and decorated gargoyles and other Gothic ornaments.

    The estate’s construction took more than six years. Following Carvalho Monteiro’s death, the property was purchased by Waldemar d’Orey. It was owned by the family until 1987, when it was sold to a Japanese conglomerate. For ten years, they kept the estate closed to the public. The estate was purchased by the local authorities in 1997, and after restoration, it was opened to the public in 1998.

    View upwards from the bottom of the Initiation Well. Author: Stijndon – CC BY-SA 3.0

    Additionally, the estate’s park contains a large garden and an extensive and perplexing network of tunnels with numerous entrances constructed in a variety of styles. There are grottoes and a chapel on display, as well as the Waterfall Lake and Leda’s Cave, which is located beneath the Regaleira Tower.

    Bottom of the Initiation well. Author: Stijndon – CC BY-SA 3.0

    In some ways, the Initiation Well serves as an entrance to the underground labyrinth as well. A series of underground walkways connects it to the other entrances. The Initiation Well features an eye-catching spiral staircase supported by carved columns that descends nine landings to the bottom of the well.


    The spacing of these landings, as well as the number of steps between them, are believed to be related to Tarot mysticism and Masonic principles. At the bottom of the Initiation Well is a compass atop a Knights Templar cross, which is said to have been Carvalho Monteiro’s coat of arms, indicating his Rosicrucian affiliation.

    Initiation Well
    Rain down the Initiation Well. Author: Stijndon – CC BY-SA 3.0

    The nine small round landings separated by fifteen steps alludes to Dante’s Divine Comedy and may represent the ‘Nine Circles of Hell,’ the ‘Nine Sections of Purgatory,’ and the ‘Nine Skies of Paradise.

    One of the entrances to the labyrinth. Author: Lusitana CC BY 2.5

    For the Initiation There is a well that looks like a tower that is upside down, and depending on which way the adept walks, it can be a journey into the depths of Mother Earth or a rise up into light. The well is used as a symbol for the death/rebirth allegory, which is common in many mystical traditions. Through the well, you’re born again.

    Tunnel starting from the Eastern Grotto. Author: Lusitana – CC BY 2.5

    On the property, there’s also a smaller well. It has a straight staircase that connects several floors with ring-shaped floors to each other. An unfinished well is called that. Tunnels under the ground connect the two wells. There is a structure in Italy that looks a lot like these wells. There are also two man-made lakes and a lot of fountains on the land.

    Read another Article From Us: Images Of The Abandoned Car Graveyard In Sweden

    The Waterfall Lake and its system of caves. Author: Husond – CC BY-SA 3.0

    A lot of effort was put into building and planning the wells, even though there are no written records of how the wells were used or what happened there. The fact that we don’t know the answer lets us enjoy the mystery of these unique structures.

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    The archaeological ruins of Holyrood Abbey in Scotland

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    It served as a source of inspiration for many artists, including the composer Felix Mendelssohn.

    At dusk today, we visited the palace where Queen Mary and her husband, Prince Philip, once resided.” As you can see, the chapel’s roof has been torn off. This and the altar where Mary was crowned Queen of Scotland are covered in grass and ivy. Everything is ruined, decayed, and the sky is clear. There may be the beginnings of my “Scottish Symphony,” I believe. – Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy

    Located in the city of Edinburgh, Holyrood Abbey is a ruined Augustinian abbey. For the Augustinian Canons Regular, King David I of Scotland erected the abbey in 1128. In medieval folklore, the abbey’s construction was God’s will, and it came to pass after a deer’s divine intervention. During the Feast of the Cross (a Christian commemoration day), King David was reportedly attacked by a wild stag while hunting in the woods east of Edinburgh in 1127.

    The ruins of Holyrood Abbey/ Author: LASZLO ILYES – CC BY 2.0

    He was flung to the ground by his terrified horse and found himself face-to-face with a ferocious wild animal. Suddenly, a shining holy cross appeared in the sky above the king as he tried to grab the antlers of the stag with his own hands in self-defense. The king was saved when the stag turned around and fled the scene.

    As a result of his emotional response, he concluded that the miracle was an act of God. In gratitude for his miraculous escape from the stag and the cross, King David ordered the construction of an abbey at that exact spot where he encountered the animals. In the following year, the abbey’s construction began.

    When it comes to the abbey’s name and the adjoining palace, Holyrood translates to “Holy Cross” (rood is an old word for a cross or crucifix). Abbey received a piece of True Cross from St. Margaret, which was brought to Holyrood Abbey from Waltham Abbey, and kept in a golden reliquary until the 14th century.

    The Black Rood of Scotland was another name for the True Cross. An extremely valuable and holy piece of the Holy Cross was taken by England in 1346 and placed in Durham Cathedral, where it has remained ever since. During the Reformation, the relic was lost.

    The Chapel Royal at the time of James VII

    As a result, the late 12th-century abbey was built on a luxurious template, with a massive nave of eight bays. Six bay aisled choir, three transepts with central tower, and huge twin towers on the west front of the enormous building. The doorway and the north wall of the church, for example, retain their Romanesque architectural style. In the rest of the building, which underwent a major renovation in the 13th century, Gothic architecture can be clearly seen in the dominant arches.

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    The aisle vault of the 4th bay, showing the rough quality of the construction/ Author: DimitrisTh – CC BY-SA 4.0

    The abbey has seen its share of historic occurrences and has suffered as a result of the region’s turbulent past. The abbey was frequented by Scottish monarchs because of its proximity to Edinburgh Castle. James II, III, and IV were all married at Holyrood Abbey, where James II and Charles I were crowned, and where James II and Charles I were crowned. The Scottish Parliament has met at the abbey several times over the centuries.

    Its regular use began to decline in the 16th century as a result of political events and warfare. Bells, lead, and other valuable items were stolen by Earl of Hertford’s English armies during the War of the Rough Wooing, which ravaged the abbey.

    The abbey was further damaged and monastic services were halted during the Scottish Reformation, and the eastern end of the abbey was demolished in 1570. As a parish church in 1688, Holyrood was looted and the altars destroyed. As a result of a botched reconstruction in 1758 that collapsed ten years later, Holyrood Abbey now has the eerie silhouette that we see today.

    archaeological ruins
    The ghostly image of the church/ Author: Kim Traynor – CC BY-SA 3.0

    It’s hard to deny that Holyrood Abbey has had an impact on many artists, poets, and writers. Felix Mendelssohn was one of them. A visit to the abbey during his first trip to Britain in 1829 inspired him to write his great Scottish Symphony, which is named after the abbey (The Symphony No. 3 in A minor, Op. 56).

    The ruins of Holyrood Abbey’s nave/ Author: XtoF – CC BY-SA 4.0

    Holyrood Palace, the official residence of the British monarch in Scotland, was built at the end of the 17th century next to Holyrood Abbey. The roofless abbey and the Royal Palace are two of Edinburgh’s most popular tourist attractions today.

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    Derelict Siemensbahn Railway Line in Berlin

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    In Berlin, there is a Siemensbahn railway line that is nearly 4.5 kilometers long that was abandoned (2.7 miles). After a workers’ strike in 1980, it was shut down and no longer used after being built solely by Siemens. The line will be restored and put back into service by 2025 if a current project goes forward.

    Beginning in 1847 with the establishment of Siemens & Halske as a manufacturer of electrical equipment, railway vehicles and household appliances, the history of railroads began. Werner Siemens and Johann Halske were the company’s founders.

    The abandoned railway and a factory which is still operational nowadays. By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    In order to expand their business, they purchased 494 acres of land north-east of Berlin in 1897, totaling more than 200 hectares. For the benefit of their employees’ social and cultural well-being, the company constructed not only a new production facility but also a research center and residential settlements nearby.

    Siemensstadt was the name given to this new neighborhood, which by 1927 had around 55,000 residents. However, because so few employees lived close to the workplace, getting to and from work was a major inconvenience. This is why Siemens built a train station on-site for the convenience of its workers.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    Over 200 hectares (494 acres) of land was acquired north-east of Berlin in 1897 as part of their business expansion. Besides the new production facility, they also constructed a research center and residential settlements complete with all the necessary social and cultural amenities for their employees.

    About 55,000 people lived in Siemensstadt by 1927, when it was given the name of Siemensstadt. However, because so few employees lived nearby, commuting was a major issue. As a result, Siemens decided to construct its own railway station in order to allow its employees to arrive at work more quickly.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    The Siemensstadt-Fürstenbrunn station was built in 1905 as part of the Hamburg and Lehrter Bahn, and it became operational in the same year. Employees loved this station, but it quickly became overcrowded when it came time to change shifts.

    There were simply too many employees for Siemens to stagger the start and end times of their shifts, and a new solution had to be found.

    When World War I broke out, plans to improve transportation were put on hold, and the era of inflation began, delaying things even more. In 1925, Siemens and Deutsche Reichsbahn-Gesellschaft found a way to expand the route (DGR).

    Derelict Siemensbahn Railway
    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    Siemens agreed to finance the project with DGR’s supervision and then take over management of it in April 1927, signing a contract in the process. The building process began in 1927 and was completed in 1929. At Jungfernheide station, a branch of the Ringbahn was available for people to take to get to Gartenfield.

    There were 400 government and press representatives in attendance at the official opening of the new Siemensbahn railway line on December 13, 1929. It was jokingly suggested by DGR’s General Director that Siemens had given his company an early Christmas present because Siemens had paid 14 million reichsmarks to build the railway, while DGR was only paying three million.

    It took five days after the official opening ceremony for the government to get down to work. Taking the new route from Jungfernheide to Gartenfeld in less than 10 minutes was made possible thanks to the new route.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    Siemens had approximately 90,000 employees who commuted to work via train, with 17,000 of those employees taking advantage of the rail service. Weekend excursions to Tegel Forest were popular among Siemens employees and members of the general public alike.

    Transportation by train was severely constrained and many lines were destroyed during World War II. The Spree Bridge was bombed and Soviet troops demolished parts of the route, making it impassable. Service could be resumed in September 1945, but there were significant restrictions.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    Damaged lines were gradually repaired over time. As part of the Spree Bridge reconstruction in 1954, Siemans provided steel. However, the route was not fully operational again until the end of 1956.

    Siemens had already relocated its headquarters to Munich, so there were fewer travelers by this point. Over time, this was one of Berlin’s least-used routes. The frequency of service was reduced from every five minutes to every 20 minutes due to the use of older trains that were less reliable.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    East and West Berlin were separated by a wall on August 13, 1961. Consequently, the number of passengers dropped even more. It was ten years after the Wall went up that the number of passengers on the line was 75 percent lower than it had been before. West Berliners went on a strike, which resulted in a lot of trains running with no passengers.

    Trains and other services were cut back as well as jobs were cut as a result of this decrease in passengers. In September 1980, the Siemensbahn came to an end after a ten-day strike by workers. In 1980, the railway line was shut down.

    Derelict Siemensbahn Railway
    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    No maintenance was done on the track systems or railway stations after the line was taken out of service. The railway line deteriorated and the tracks became overgrown and decayed as a result of this neglect.

    Siemensstadt, on the other hand, was one of six modernist housing estates to be granted World Heritage Status by UNESCO in 2008 because of Siemens’ use of renowned architects to construct innovative buildings for its employees.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    This year, Siemens opened an R&D facility in Simensstadt and stated that it would be interested in reopening the railway line. A 2025 target date has been set by Siemens and the Berlin Senate in order to reopen the rail line and its stations.

    Determine which sections and stations can be saved and rebuilt by surveyors hired by the city of New York City. There’s also the issue of the Spree Bridge, which was largely dismantled a few years ago when the river was straightened so that larger ships could access it.

    Additionally, a new route may be developed, bringing the Siemensbahn to a new level of service.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    Alexandr and his LiveJournal account are to be commended for sharing these stunning images of this location.

    When Alex isn’t writing about his home country, you can find him writing about other places. You can see more of his photos from this location in an article he’s written about it. Check out his Facebook page and his LiveJournal account.

    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    Derelict Siemensbahn Railway

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    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik
    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik
    By Alex Technolirik – LiveJournal @technolirik

    See more Article From Viral Eye Here: An old concrete ship in Aptos, California: the SS Palo Alto.

    An Amazing Abandoned Soviet Military Base in Hungary

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    The village of Szentkirályszabadja in Hungary’s Veszprém District used to be a military base for the Soviet Union. It also used to be a barracks town for the Soviet Union. Because of the buildings that look like they were made in the Soviet Union and because it looks like a post-apocalyptic wasteland, this place is sometimes called the Hungarian Chernobyl because of these things.

    It was built a long time ago. Most of its buildings were built in the 1960s, though. There are, however, some older buildings that date back to the 1930s, when the area was used as an airbase with a training school.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    The village of Szentkirályszabadja, located in Hungary’s Veszprém District, is the site of a former Soviet military base, which was later transformed into a Soviet barracks town. Because of the distinctive Soviet-style architecture and the fact that it resembles a post-apocalyptic wasteland, this location is sometimes referred to as the “Hungarian Chernobyl. “

    A large number of the base’s buildings were constructed in the 1960s. Some of the older structures, on the other hand, date back to the 1930s, when the area was used as an airbase with an accompanying training academy.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    Russian wallpaper By CarloR – sightraider.com

    Soviet Abandoned Soviet Military Base in Hungary

    According to several Hungarian internet sources, Hungarians were barred from entering the area, and Soviet soldiers were barred from leaving it. However, this did not prevent the Soviets from employing Hungarians in childcare and the theater, nor did it prevent a fair trade between soldiers and locals from forming between them.

    Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in the late 1980s, many residents of the base began to leave the facility. There was plenty of time for the soldiers to withdraw, and it took until 1996 for them to pack up and transport anything of value, such as armaments and statues.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    The structures were looted for their materials after 1996, when the area was no longer guarded. Doors, windows, railings and wire were among the items taken from the site, as were other items made of wood or iron.

    Once the Soviets had left the country, the Hungarian government made the decision to demolish the various military infrastructures that had been built during their time in the country, and Szentkirályszabadja was one of those structures.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    However, even though the war helicopter regiment was disbanded in the summer of 2004, for a period of time following that, the airport served as a base for commercial transportation. Although the barracks were in a state of disarray, the airfield and control tower were still operational, allowing it to continue to operate.

    Soviet Military Base
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    Szentkirályszabadja is currently a ghost town, made up of abandoned Soviet barracks that have been demolished and looted. In many of the buildings, the roofs are collapsing and vegetation has encroached inside. Young woodlands rather than advanced civilization can be seen on the city’s roads and sidewalks.

    The curved roofs of the former aircraft hangers, which can be seen from a distance, are of particular interest. According to those who’ve entered one of the hangars, the roof has nearly collapsed and weeds have taken root throughout the facility.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    The site is frequently visited by curious urban explorers because the city’s entrance is so open and accessible. Many of the early visitors were able to take pictures of the murals that adorned the school and nursery’s walls.

    With its overgrown nature, broken glass and debris on the ground, and crumbling buildings, Szentkirályszabadja is a dangerous place to visit. Airsoft and paintball enthusiasts frequently use the ruins for their battles.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    CarloR, the photographer, has a travel blog. For him, it’s all about going to places that aren’t usually part of the typical vacation itinerary. His trips are meticulously planned in advance, and he spends as much time researching his destinations as possible.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    After that, he reveals all that he has learned and experienced during the planning process and upon arriving at his destination.

    CarloR also takes a lot of photos and publishes them in an article about his explorations. Inquire about his trips on his website and don’t hesitate to get in touch.

    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com
    By CarloR – sightraider.com

    Another Article From Us: The Stunning Pineapple House at Dunmore Park in Airth, Scotland

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    By CarloR – sightraider.com

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    An old concrete ship in Aptos, California: the SS Palo Alto.

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    One of the ships that should have been in the First World War is called the SS Palo Alto. It took so long to build that she didn’t get to fight in the war. Seacliff State Beach, in California, is where she is now. She was built in 1918. This ship is very special because it is made of reinforced concrete, which is very strong.

    During the First World War, there was not enough steel in the United States. In 1917, President Woodrow Wilson agreed to a fleet of ships made of reinforced concrete for an emergency.

    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma

    This is the concrete oil tanker, the SS Palo Alto, on a test run on September 10, 1920 in Oakland.

    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma

    The SS Palo Alto and two other tankers were built in Oakland, California, in 1917. They were 420 feet long. When the SS Palo Alto was built, it was one of three concrete tankers that were made in California. During the war, the tankers were meant to be used to refuel other warships at sea.

    Both of them were built in May 1919. Construction was done late, so the ships didn’t get to fight in the war, which was over only a few months after the construction was done.

    She instead lay empty at a naval dockyard in Oakland for more than a decade until 1929, when she was bought by a Nevada-based company called Seacliff Amusement Corporation, which used the ship to bring people to Seacliff Amusement Park in Nevada.

    This company owned most of the land in Aptos Township in California, and they wanted to build nice homes for wealthy San Francisco residents. If there were a lot of storms, the company would have to start over and build a huge pier all over again because the large waves would break the pier and destroy it.

    By digital94086

    Because of this, the company bought the SS Palo Alto in 1929. The Corporation thought the ship would be a great place for fun and fishing, so the ship was moved to the bay.

    People didn’t like the idea of going on trips to the ship at first. Because her doors were open, water flooded in, and the ship was stuck to the ground for good. A year after that, a pier was built that led to the half-sunken ship.

    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma

    The ship was changed so that there was a casino, a dance hall, a heated swimming pool, and a restaurant on board. In 1932, Seacliff Amusement Corporation went out of business. This was because of both the Great Depression and the seasonal nature of the business.

    A winter storm hit the area soon after the company went bankrupt. The SS Palo Alto was left with a huge crack in her middle. Afterward, when the ship was even worse off because it was hit by the waves, its owners were broke and had to sell off all of its valuable parts. This included steel, engines, and even the dance floor!

    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma

    In 1936, the state of California bought the ship for $1 and turned it into a fishing pier, which was very popular with local anglers right away. The SS Palo Alto was made a part of Seacliff State Beach because it was built there.

    In 1950, the ship was closed down because parts of it were too dangerous, so fishermen and people who wanted to see it had to stay away. The condition of the ship had deteriorated a lot because she had been hit by storms.

    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma

    People could enjoy the ship again for a short time during a restoration project that ran from 1983 until 1988. An all-time visitor ban was put in place in 1998.

    In 2003, oil leaked from an unknown source and killed dozens of seabirds. There was a leak on the SS Palo Alto in early 2005, and it was found that it came from there. People from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife started a project in the fall of 2006 to clean up the ship. They drained 500 US gallons of oil from the ship.

    Overhead drone picture of the USS Palo Alto on July 3rd, 2019. By Onebadagr, CC BY-SA 4.0

    More than 200 dead birds and two seals were found during the cleanup. About $1.7 million was spent on the project, which is the same amount that was spent on the first ship.

    The ship is getting worse and worse, and every storm causes her to break apart a little more. A piece of the ship was turned over by strong waves in 2016. In January 2017, the stern was torn off.

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    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma

    Because of its oil leaks, the ship now serves as an artificial reef for seabirds and fish. When you look at the concrete structure, you can often see seabirds like pelicans and cormorants sitting on top of it. Below the surface, fish eat algae and live in the sunken parts of the pond where they can. Sea lions and other marine animals also come to the ship from time to time.

    A lot of people have called on the state to get rid of the SS Palo Alto because of how bad it is. However, the costs of getting rid of the ship can be in the tens of millions of dollars. This is because the ship is very heavy and stands in the sand. Because the shipwreck is so popular with people in the area, there are a lot of people who don’t want the vessel to be taken away.

    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma

    The SS Palo Alto is not open to the public right now. Whether you’re in a boat or a fisherman, you must stay at least 100 feet away from the ship at all times. Centennial events were held in 2019 for the Seacliff, which has become an important part of the town.

    Photos of the shipwreck in Aptos, California, taken by Steven Rojo are for sale, and he owns them. It means a lot to us that he let us use his pictures. In his Flickr account, there are more pictures of the SS Palo Altro. You can see more of them there. Please follow him on Flickr so you don’t miss any of his beautiful work.

    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma
     
    By Steven Rojo, Flickr @pidooma
     

    See more Articles from Us: Amazing Tito’s Villa Izvor at Plitvice National Park

    10 beautiful and historic locations that amaze you most

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    While historical sights are always popular, some are worthy of actually being the focus of your trip.

    10. St. Peter’s Basilica, Vatican City, Italy

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    As soon as you arrive in Rome, you won’t be able to miss any of its historic or religious landmarks. The Vatican City’s St. Peter’s Basilica, designed by Michelangelo, Bramante, Bernini, and Maderno in the 1600s, is a stunning piece of art.

    Despite the fact that it is not the primary church of the Roman Catholic religion, the church is considered one of the holiest in the world. The late Renaissance church is also said to be the final resting place of St. Peter.

    9. Stonehenge, Salisbury, England

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    Salisbury, England, is home to one of the most intriguing sights in England. The heads on Easter Island have always baffled people, and now you can see how they came to be.

    Weird structures thought to date from 3000 to 2000 BC raise questions about how advanced our ancestors’ civilizations once was. Archaeologists and architects alike flock to this popular tourist destination in the United Kingdom. From the beginning, the World Heritage Site is thought to have been associated with burial rituals.

    8. Petra, Jordan

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    Salisbury, England, is home to one of the most intriguing sights in England. The heads on Easter Island have always baffled people, and now you can see how they came to be.

    Weird structures thought to date from 3000 to 2000 BC raise questions about how advanced our ancestors’ civilizations once was. Archaeologists and architects alike flock to this popular tourist destination in the United Kingdom. From the beginning, the World Heritage Site is thought to have been associated with burial rituals.

    7. Taj Mahal, Uttar Pradesh, India

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    The Taj Mahal, a world-famous structure, has a fascinating history. Here’s some background information in case your history teacher didn’t go over it: Pregnancy complications killed Shah Jahan’s 14th wife in the early 1630s. The emperor’s grief led him to commission the Taj Mahal, a memorial to his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal, which he had built himself.

    According to legend, Shah Jahan was so enamored with the white marble temple that he had the architects and builders’ hands cut off to ensure that another one like it would never be built.

    6. The Parthenon, Athens, Greece

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    Located in Greece, Athens has a rich history and awe-inspiring natural beauty. In contrast, the dilapidated building that sits within its confines has a fascinating backstory of its own. The Parthenon was a Greek temple dedicated to Athena Parthenos, the goddess of wisdom (Athena the Virgin).

    Starting in 447 BC, construction on the structure continued until 438 BC, which is remarkable given the amount of time and resources required to complete something of this magnitude. Although the Parthenon has suffered some physical damage over the years, it has remained largely intact.

    5. Machu Picchu, Peru

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    Machu Picchu is a pre-Colombian ruin in Peru that once housed Native American settlers from the Inca Empire. From 1438 to 1533, the settlement was a significant portion of the South American population.

    For years, the population was deprived of many of the resources that the old world enjoyed. However, they were extremely resourceful and were able to accomplish things like farming. You can now take the four-day hike to the top of the mountain and gaze down at the ancient civilization, which is slowly eroding.

    4. Moai Statues, Easter Island, Chile

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    Easter Island’s Moai Statues, discovered in 1722, have stumped historians and archaeologists ever since. For now, the only thing we can deduce from the guardians is that they were constructed from volcanic ash by our late relatives around 1200 AD.

    Nearly 1000 of them are scattered across the island, a reminder that, despite our current technological advancements, humans were already technologically advanced in the past. In the same way that we don’t know exactly how the Easter Island heads were built, there are many structures around the world.

    3. Hagia Sophia, Istanbul, Turkey

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    Istanbul, as it stands, is a city steeped in history. Constantine, the ruler of the Byzantine Empire, named Istanbul as the capital of his great empire, but under a different name: Constantinople.

    After the fall of the Byzantine Empire, the Greek Orthodox church Hagia Sophia was converted into an Ottoman mosque. It is now open to the public as a museum, where visitors can admire the beautiful architecture that was in place around 360 AD. In the past, it was referred to as the “eighth wonder of the world”.

    2. The Colosseum, Rome, Italy

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    Known as the amphitheater where gladiators would fight to the death, the Colosseum is one of Rome’s most well-known structures. There was a delay between 70 and 73 AD in the completion of the great amphitheater.

    As soon as it was completed, it became known as the largest amphitheater in the Roman world. That’s quite a bit of time to keep going for the first 100 days of its existence! After natural disasters, weather, and (unfortunately) vandalism, the historic structure is now in ruins.

    1. Cairo, Egypt

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    Cairo, the capital of South Africa, is home to many historical landmarks, including the Pyramids of Giza and the Sphinx, which are both nearby, as well as the Egyptian Museum, which houses 27 mummies and more than 12,000 artifacts. You can’t possibly see everything!

    The city, which was once a major shipping hub on the Silk Road, is now a treasure trove of stunning architecture and fascinating stories. There’s a lot to see here, so a guide is highly recommended.

    See more: History, Dynasties, Religion, and Literature in Ancient Egypt.

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    Images Of The Abandoned Car Graveyard In Sweden

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    One of the most enjoyable pastimes is embarking on long journeys into the unknown. Even if they’re just looking at photos and reading stories online, people are enthralled by abandoned locations. You’re out of the woods if you go see them in person.

    In this article, we’d like to introduce a person who enjoys exploring the unknown and finding hidden treasures. Meet Matt Emmett, a photographer who has a deep desire to explore the world’s most eerie and beautiful abandoned places. In Bastnas, Sweden, he had been looking forward to seeing a smattering of abandoned cars, which turned out to be one of his most anticipated destinations.

    In the past, it was a scrapyard that had been reclaimed by nature. This was the final item on his bucket list, so he made sure to bring back some souvenirs for us. This graveyard of automobiles is awe-inspiring and he captured it on camera to show the world. Check out some of Matt’s photos by scrolling down this page.

    Information and images provided by Matt Emmett.

    In the 1940s to the 1960s, a lot of cars were abandoned in this area. After people removed their parts from the scrapyard, it is said to have been abandoned. This was a place to look for hidden treasure because auto parts were so expensive back then!

    Abandoned Car
    Photo Credit:Matt Emmett
    Photo Credit: Matt Emmett

    These images show that, despite being abandoned for more than half a century, this place still has a unique beauty. On Bored Panda, he shared this amazing collection of abandoned car photos.

    Photo Credit:Matt Emmett
    Photo Credits: Matt Emmett

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    Photo Credit:Matt Emmett
    Photo Credit:Matt Emmett
    Photo Credit:Matt Emmett
    Photo Credit:Matt Emmett

    See more: Top 25 Must-Drive Classic Cars Before You Die

    Photo Credit:Matt Emmett